Newcomers and Nationalism - Video Lectures

This lecture series for the programme: “NEWCOMERS AND NATIONALISM: Exploring the challenge of belonging in Europe” is presented by academics and practitioners and complimented by views of the public. We invite you to watch these videos, form your own perspectives and explore and share your ideas with your fellow students.

This programme is divided into 10 weekly themes that begins with setting the scene for migration into Europe and moves into exploration of the challenges of identity, belonging and integration. The speakers invite you to reconsider accepted truths about migration and reassess the policy and politics that surround this poignant issue. In a globalised, interconnected world, what does belonging to a nation really mean and equally what is the role and experience of being the ‘other’? We conclude the video lectures with a look to what the future holds for nationalism and newcomers in Europe – are we moving into a world of superdiversity?!

This opening week sets the context for the recent migration into Europe, giving a historical perspective of migration in and out of Europe and an introduction to the terms: migrant, asylum seeker and refugee.

Week 10

How is (super)diversity changing how we belong? 

Super diversity is rapidly changing the way communities look like, Dr. Sigona argues. He continues to explore the pros and cons of such a change by giving different concrete examples.

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What will nationalism look like in a future Europe?

Where do we go from here? University of Birmingham’s Nando Sigona and European University Institute’s Anna Triandafyllidou share some concluding thoughts on nationalism, belonging, and the way forward for European societies.

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Week 9

Anna Triandafyllidou

What does nationalism look like in today’s global world?

As globalization becomes more relevant, does nationalism become less relevant? European University Institute’s Anna Triandafyllidou explains how nationalism as a concept has changed in today’s world but why it still holds meaning for many.

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Voices from Barcelona

How is independence in Catalonia related to nationalism?

Catalonia’s  independence is derived from how Catalans identify themselves. Various people in Barcelona talk about the independence and “The Catalans” form of nationalism.  

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Anna Triandafyllidou

What is a city without migration?

Can you imagine a city without traces of migration or are these roots part of a cities DNA? And is your city part of your DNA? Cities can shape identities because here is where experiences, belonging, integration, learning and everyday life takes place.

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Week 8

Dr. Anna Triandafyllidou

How do we use Others to shape our own national identities?

How do Others factor into how we identify our own national identities? Anna Triandafyllidou of the European University Institute talks about our relational feeling to the Significant Others and how migrants and Muslims fit into the discussion.

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Dr. Nando Sigona

Where do Roma belong in European societies?

Did you know Roma are Europe’s largest minority group? Dr. Nando Sigona breaks down this group’s history of belonging on the continent and the reality of their so-called integration.

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Week 7

Migration Matters

Defining Nationalism: Voices from the Street

Everybody is talking about nationalism but what does that even mean?  Isn’t nationalism a relict from the past or do we still need it today? Migration Matters tries to explore the notions of nationalism by asking people on the street how they define the word and what it means to them.

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Migration Matters

How are nationality, citizenship and immigration connected?

Meet diversity and migration researcher Nando Sigona. He is one of your experts in this series who will be sharing his research on migration and belonging through the lens of statelessness, citizenship, and superdiversity.

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nna Triandafyllidou

Why national belonging (still) matters

Meet European University Institute’s Anna Triandafyllidou, one of your experts in this series who will tell us more about nationalism through her expertise on the Other, globalization, and cities. Then continue watching as she tackles the question, “Is nationalism a relevant concept in today’s world?”

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Week 6

Dominik Hangartner, UK

European attitudes to asylum-seekers: results from a pan-European experiment

The integration of refugees and migrants is a policy priority for every European government right now. However, according to Dominik Hangartner, political scientist at LSE Government, we know surprisingly little about what works and what doesn’t when it comes to integration. Dominik believes that we should seek empirical answers to these questions and turn them into more effective policies. In this video, he answers What are European attitudes towards asylum seekers?

 

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Dominik Hangartner, UK

Costs of a slow asylum process

The integration of refugees and migrants is a policy priority for every European government right now. However, according to Dominik Hangartner, political scientist at LSE Government, we know surprisingly little about what works and what doesn’t when it comes to integration. Dominik believes that we should seek empirical answers to these questions and turn them into more effective policies. In these videos, he answers what are the costs of the lengthy asylum process.

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Dominik Hangartner, UK

How does citizenship affect integration?

The integration of refugees and migrants is a policy priority for every European government right now. However, according to Dominik Hangartner, political scientist at LSE Government, we know surprisingly little about what works and what doesn’t when it comes to integration. Dominik believes that we should seek empirical answers to these questions and turn them into more effective policies. In these videos, he answers about the impact of citizenship on integration.

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Dr. Irene Bloemraad

Is citizenship the crown of integration?

Obtaining citizenship is often seen as the final step, or crown, of integration, awarded only to those who have proven their ‘successful integration’. But what if getting citizenship was an easier, earlier option for immigrants? How would that impact their integration process? And why is citizenship so important for immigrant integration more generally? Prof. Dr. Irene Bloemraad shares learnings from the Canadian case.

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Week 5

Alan Manning, LSE

Thoughts on migration policy

Is there a wall high enough so nobody will try to climb over it? No? Then Alan Manning proposes that maybe it is time to rethink restrictive migration policy that is more concerned with managing the numbers instead of the consequences of migration.

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Chandran Kukathas, LSE

What do “open borders” really mean?

“Open borders” are important to people inside the borders (Insiders) as well as outside them (outsiders), Kukathas argues. He explores further the concept of border control and its implications.

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Ruben Andersson, Oxford University

Thinking of borders as points of connection

In our political and media narratives, we often operate with binary notions: secure or insecure borders, legal or illegal immigration. Ruben Andersson, an anthropologist and Associate Professor at Oxford University who researches undocumented migration from West Africa to Southern Europe, challenges this way of thinking. Andersson immerses himself in the reality of migration, accompanying migrants, border guards, and aid workers to present the impact of the migration control industry from their perspectives.

In this video, he introduces his ‘impossible idea’ which is that borders are seen as points of connection’ instead of an object to be defended. He believes that thinking about migrants only as risks to borders is holding a simplistic view of migration, and that international mobility will happen regardless of what fences and border security systems are used.

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Ruben Andersson, Oxford

Will deals like the one with Turkey reduce migration?

In our political and media narratives, we often operate with binary notions: secure or insecure borders, legal or illegal immigration. Ruben Andersson, an anthropologist and Associate Professor at Oxford University who researches undocumented migration from West Africa to Southern Europe, challenges this way of thinking. Andersson immerses himself in the reality of migration, accompanying migrants, border guards, and aid workers to present the impact of the migration control industry from their perspectives.

 

In this video, Andersson analyses the EU-Turkey deal through a historical perspective, comparing it with the partnership between Spain in 2006 and some West African countries to stop migration. He points out that this only switched the flow of migration towards other routes and didn’t solve the migration problem. Moreover, he highlights the risks of the dynamics created where these countries can use the idea of migration as a threat as means to put pressure on europe to provide larger concessions.

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Suzi Hall, LSE

Why is Rye Lane important for the economy?

Suzi Hall, an architect-ethnographer and Director of the LSE Cities programme, studies the inner workings of multi-ethnic streets in five British cities. In this video, Hall takes us to a super-diverse street in South London, Peckham’s Rye Lane, where proprietors from more than 20 countries run their businesses on the 10-min long stretch. She explains what we can learn from Rye Lane, in terms of how migrants get on the job ladder, what streets like this mean for the economy, and what we can learn about the ways migration shapes modern cities.

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Week 4

Dr. Naika Foroutan

Do you need to learn diversity?

If you’re born in a diverse society, doesn’t that mean you understand diversity? In this first episode of Chapter 4, Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan turns back to the research to reveal the apparent paradox between people’s cognitive awareness of democratic values vs. how this plays out in practice.

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Berlin Braucht Dich

Do schools and companies need to learn diversity?

We may be surrounded by diversity, but does that necessarily mean we automatically understand it? In this video, Gülcin from Berlin Braucht Dich offers concrete examples from her work for why schools and companies in multicultural cities still need to learn diversity and cross-cultural communication.

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Are Multiculturalism and Social Cohesion at Odds With One Another?

Does supporting multiculturalism make us stronger or does it threaten social cohesion? Prof. Dr. Irene Bloemraad shares findings from her research and the Multiculturalism Policy Index that help explain the link between multicultural policy and integration.

 

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Dr. Naika Foroutan

Immigrants vs. Natives: Does this divide exist?

Let’s dig a bit deeper into the common idea that there’s a natural divide between ‘immigrants’ and ‘natives’. Spoiler alert: it’s not as simple as that, at least when it comes to political views and electoral preferences. Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan explains how the migration issue fits into larger debates within society.

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Week 3

Dr. Naika Foroutan

Who do hybrid identities make people uncomfortable?

One of our survey speakers in an earlier video from this chapter said that, to live in Germany, you must decide if you want to be German or ‘something else’. But what if you’re not tied to one set of borders, have dual citizenship, or claim more than one home? And why is this sometimes difficult for others to accept? In this episode, Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan presents sociological concepts that frame these divisions around multifaceted identities and the unease surrounding them.

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Taiye Selasi

Don’t ask me where I’m from, ask where I’m local.

When someone asks you where you’re from … do you sometimes not know how to answer? Writer Taiye Selasi speaks on behalf of “multi-local” people, who feel at home in the town where they grew up, the city they live now and maybe another place or two. “How can I come from a country?” she asks. “How can a human being come from a concept?”

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Gülcin Durmuss, Berlin Braucht Dich

What Comes to Mind When You Look at Me?

We all make assumptions about each other, based on things like race, ethnicity, gender, and more. In this final unit of chapter one, Gülcin from Berlin Braucht Dich! and Yilmaz from Heroes share the stories of what happened when they asked Germans to say what they thought of them based on looks alone.

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Week 2

Hein de Haas, Migration Matters

Who are we allowing in? Who are we trying to keep out?

In this video, Hein de Haas challenges the notion that immigration policies are being restricted. Instead, borders are more open than ever to certain types of migrants, and this is creating or exacerbating a global class system in which the privileged are privileged further.

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Nassim Majidi, Migration Matters

Why do people risk their lives to come to Europe?

In this episode of A Migrant’s View, migration specialist Nassim Majidi offers insights into what really motivates migrants to make the oftentimes perilous journey to Europe. Regardless of whether you agree with her assessments, her research into what drives decisions to migrate will enhance and deepen your perspective on the issue.

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How to buy a passport

Did you know citizenship is for sale? It’s true, many countries are offering it – for a price. This video explores the market for passports, citizenship and green cards.

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Week 1

Hein de Haas, Migration Matters

Are we living in a time of unprecedented migration?

More people than ever before are on the move, right? Not exactly. More people may be moving, but there are also more people in the world. In this episode of Migration 101, a course on the drivers and impacts of migration with Professor of Sociology Hein de Haas, one of the world’s leading migration researchers, we take a closer look at the history of migration and what this means for the future.

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Nassim Majidi, Migration Matters

Refugees, Migrants, Asylum-Seekers: Who Are They?

Origin country expert Nassim Majidi lays out the definitions of terms such as refugee, asylum-seeker, and migrant. Can migrants be classified into neat categories? Should they be?

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Hein de Haas, Migration Matters

How has migration to Europe changed over time?

Since the summer of 2015, the world has gotten to know a new Europe – one shaken by a perceived crisis of migrants and refugees. Human beings in distress are images now irrevocably tied to the shores of Italy or Greece. But is this the reality? Are migrants, indeed, overrunning Europe? No, says one of the world’s leading migration researchers and Professor of Sociology at the University of Amsterdam, Hein de Haas.

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Nassim Majidi, Migration Matters

“Good Refugees” Stay in the Region but “Bad Migrants” Come to Europe?

Nassim Majidi addresses the often-heard view that those asylum-seekers who stay in their region are more deserving of protection than those who come to Europe of their own volition.

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