Cultural Encounters - Video lectures

This lecture series is presented by academics and practitioners and complemented by views of the public. Please note that the views presented in the video lectures are those of the individual speakers and do not represent those of Sharing Perspectives Foundation.

Prior to your online group meeting each week, participants are expected to watch the week’s videos and then respond to at least one lecture with a comment, observation or question.

Comments should be 1-2 paragraphs in length. Your response shouldn’t be a summary, but instead should demonstrate you grappling with the concepts, questions, and implications in the lecture. Feel free to include questions of your own that you would like to discuss further with your group

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For details see the COURSE MANUAL

Week 5: A place to belong

Migration Matters

Defining Nationalism: Voices from the Street

Everybody is talking about nationalism but what does that even mean?  Isn’t nationalism a relict from the past or do we still need it today? Migration Matters tries to explore the notions of nationalism by asking people on the street how they define the word and what it means to them.

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Migration Matters

How are nationality, citizenship and immigration connected?

Meet diversity and migration researcher Nando Sigona. He is one of your experts in this series who will be sharing his research on migration and belonging through the lens of statelessness, citizenship, and superdiversity.

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Anna Triandafyllidou

Why national belonging (still) matters

Meet European University Institute’s Anna Triandafyllidou, one of your experts in this series who will tell us more about nationalism through her expertise on the Other, globalization, and cities. Then continue watching as she tackles the question, “Is nationalism a relevant concept in today’s world?”

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Dr. Sinem Adar

How do Erdogan and the AKP get votes from Turkish citizens abroad?

Those belonging to the Turkish diaspora in Europe can be criticized for continuing to vote for the AKP. Humboldt University’s Sinem Adar explains why this is controversial and how Erdogan manages to court voters abroad.

 

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Additional Resources and Alternative Perspectives

Interested to learn more about this week’s topic? We have selected some materials for you. These resources consist of introductory information, in-depth texts, case studies and challenging, counter perspectives.

 

Introductions and Definitions

What does belonging mean to you (Part 1) & (Part 2) Coram (2017)

Sense of Belonging: Literature review Carla Valle Painter (2013) 

 

Additional Contexts

Hyphen-nation New York Times (2017)

Fluid identities, diaspora youth activists and the (Post-)Arab Spring: how narratives of belonging can change over time Lea Müller-Funk (2019)

When populist nationalists tempt geopolitical fate Reva Goujon (2019)

 

Relevant Research

Imagined Communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism Benedict Anderson (1983)

Why Do Nations Matter? The struggle for belonging and security in an uncertain world Michael Skey (2012)

 

Different Perspectives

Douglas Murray – If not a Europe of ideas, then a Europe of tribes The Mill Series (2017)

Why is the anti-global backlash happening now? Thomas Hale & David Held (2017)

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Week 4: Rethinking the concept of borders

Chandran Kukathas, LSE

What do “open borders” really mean?

“Open borders” are important to people inside the borders (Insiders) as well as outside them (outsiders), Kukathas argues. He explores further the concept of border control and its implications.

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Ruben Andersson, Oxford University

Thinking of borders as points of connection

In our political and media narratives, we often operate with binary notions: secure or insecure borders, legal or illegal immigration. Ruben Andersson, an anthropologist and Associate Professor at Oxford University who researches undocumented migration from West Africa to Southern Europe, challenges this way of thinking. Andersson immerses himself in the reality of migration, accompanying migrants, border guards, and aid workers to present the impact of the migration control industry from their perspectives.

In this video, he introduces his ‘impossible idea’ which is that borders are seen as points of connection’ instead of an object to be defended. He believes that thinking about migrants only as risks to borders is holding a simplistic view of migration, and that international mobility will happen regardless of what fences and border security systems are used.

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Dr. Oliviero Angeli

Can migration explain Europe’s rise in right-wing populism?

Migration is often cited as the reason for Europe’s rise in right-wing populism and thus something that “needs to be solved.” Political scientist Oliviero Angeli of TU Dresden addresses that common perception with research showing a more complex relationship between migration and populism. 

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Ruben Andersson, Oxford

Will deals like the one with Turkey reduce migration?

In our political and media narratives, we often operate with binary notions: secure or insecure borders, legal or illegal immigration. Ruben Andersson, an anthropologist and Associate Professor at Oxford University who researches undocumented migration from West Africa to Southern Europe, challenges this way of thinking. Andersson immerses himself in the reality of migration, accompanying migrants, border guards, and aid workers to present the impact of the migration control industry from their perspectives.

 

In this video, Andersson analyses the EU-Turkey deal through a historical perspective, comparing it with the partnership between Spain in 2006 and some West African countries to stop migration. He points out that this only switched the flow of migration towards other routes and didn’t solve the migration problem. Moreover, he highlights the risks of the dynamics created where these countries can use the idea of migration as a threat as means to put pressure on europe to provide larger concessions.

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Additional Resources and Alternative Perspectives

Interested to learn more about this week’s topic? We have selected some materials for you. These resources consist of introductory information, in-depth texts, case studies and challenging, counter perspectives.

 

Introductions and Definitions

The fall and rise of global borders World Economic Forum (2017)

Migration and populism Future Citizen Institute (2019)

 

Additional Contexts

Women and girls on the move Mixed Migration Platform (2016)

OLIVIERO ANGELI – References & additional resources Migration Matters (2019)

 

Relevant Research

Introduction: the migration without borders scenario Pécoud & de Guchteneire (2007)

Immigration and freedom of movement Adam Hosein (2013)

The Temporalities of International Migration Shanthi Robertson (2014)

 

Different Perspectives

How progressivism enabled the rise of the populist right Eric Kaufmann (2019) 

Douglas Murray: Balancing justice and mercy Doha Debates (2019)

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Week 3: Who can come in?

Hein de Haas, Migration Matters

Who are we allowing in? Who are we trying to keep out?

In this video, Hein de Haas challenges the notion that immigration policies are being restricted. Instead, borders are more open than ever to certain types of migrants, and this is creating or exacerbating a global class system in which the privileged are privileged further.

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Nassim Majidi, Migration Matters

Why do people risk their lives to come to Europe?

In this episode of A Migrant’s View, migration specialist Nassim Majidi offers insights into what really motivates migrants to make the oftentimes perilous journey to Europe. Regardless of whether you agree with her assessments, her research into what drives decisions to migrate will enhance and deepen your perspective on the issue.

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How to buy a passport

Did you know citizenship is for sale? It’s true, many countries are offering it – for a price. This video explores the market for passports, citizenship and green cards.

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Additional Resources and Alternative Perspectives

Interested to learn more about this week’s topic? We have selected some materials for you. These resources consist of introductory information, in-depth texts, case studies and challenging, counter perspectives.

 

Introductions and Definitions

70 years of progress on Human Rights: Article 13, Freedom of movement United Nations (2018)

Why we need a global understanding of migration World Economic Forum (2018)

 

Additional Contexts

What Egyptian Day Workers in Jordan Face, Just to Make a Living Ammar Ahmed Al-Shuqairi (2019)

Interactive Journey: A migrant’s difficult decisions in the Gulf Migrant Rights (2019)

India Passes Controversial Citizenship Bill That Would Exclude Muslims NPR (2019)

 

Relevant Research

Emergent Global Classes and What They Mean for Immigration Politics Migration Policy Institute (2006)

The Privileged and Useful Migrant: An Evaluation of Changing Policy and Scholarly Approaches Towards High-skilled Migration Metka Hercog (2017)

 

Different Perspectives

Migrant agency: Negotiating borders and migration controls Ċetta Mainwaring (2016)

Privileged Mobility in an Age of Globality Sheila Croucher (2012)

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Week 2: Populism and authoritarianism

Dr. Israel Butler

What is populist authoritarianism?

What is populist authoritarianism and how is it different from regular populism? Dr. Israel Butler, Head of Advocacy at Civil Liberties Union for Europe, talks about populism in itself being neither good nor bad; differentiating populism authoritarianism from regular populism; and explaining this term as well as the danger it poses to democracy and human rights.

Look out for:

  • Authoritarianism
  • Elitism
  • Security vs other human needs/rights
  • Progressive values
  • Democracy vs will of the majority
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Dr. Oliviero Angeli

What does populism look like across Europe?

What are the differences between populist movements in various corners of Europe? TU Dresden’s Oliviero Angeli helps us understand the similarities and differences between populist leaders and parties in three distinct countries: Germany, the Czech Republic, and Italy. 

 

Look out for:

  • Strong nativist feeling
  • Ethnocentric approach to politics
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Dr. Ertuğ Tombu

What is populism and is it a useful term? 

What is behind the term populism, and do we need it? Political scientist Ertuğ Tombuş of Berlin’s Humboldt University gives us a primer for understanding populism and its link to democracy.

Look out for:

  • Relationship elite vs people
  • Political rhetoric that gives simplistic answers with scapegoats 
  • Political representation of people as a totality
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Additional Resources and Alternative Perspectives

Interested to learn more about this week’s topic? We have selected some materials for you. These resources consist of introductory information, in-depth texts, case studies and challenging, counter perspectives.

 

Introductions and Definitions

Introducing the experts on populism Dr. Oliviero Angeli, Dr. Sinem Adar, Dr. Ertuğ Tombuş and Dr. Israel Butler (2019)

The Rise of Populism – A Different Lens Monash University (2018)

What’s Behind the Global Rise in Populism? Bloomberg (2017)

 

Relevant Research

Migration and Populism Annual Report 2018 MIDEM (2018)

Timbro Authoritarian Populism Index 2017 Andreas Johansson Heinö (2017)

 

Additional Contexts

Populism and Corporatism in the Middle East and North Africa: a Comparative Analysis Manochehr Dorraj (2017)

The Twin Rise of Populism and Authoritarianism World Politics Review

 

Different Perspectives

Could populism actually be good for democracy? The Guardian (2018)

How populism can be turned into an opportunity, not a threat The Conversation (2018)

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Week 1: Open identities

Taiye Selasi

Don’t ask me where I’m from, ask where I’m local.

When someone asks you where you’re from … do you sometimes not know how to answer? Writer Taiye Selasi speaks on behalf of “multi-local” people, who feel at home in the town where they grew up, the city they live now and maybe another place or two. “How can I come from a country?” she asks. “How can a human being come from a concept?”

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How is (super)diversity changing how we belong? 

Super diversity is rapidly changing the way communities look like, Dr. Sigona argues. He continues to explore the pros and cons of such a change by giving different concrete examples.

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Additional Resources and Alternative Perspectives

Interested to learn more about this week’s topic? We have selected some materials for you. These resources consist of introductory information, in-depth texts, case studies and challenging, counter perspectives.

 

Introductions and Definitions

 

Relevant Research

 

Additional Contexts

Watch Video